Wines & Vines Sharing Your Wine 2015 Show Specials RU Practical POS

2017 Eastern Winery Exposition | Enology Conference Sessions

E01 | Dry Reserve Riesling: East & West
E02 | Lab Focus for Small Wineries
E03 | Oak Focus: Barrel Alternatives
E04 | What the YAN is Going on in My Fermentation?
E05 | Lemberger & Blaufrankisch Winemaker Roundtable
E06 | New Technology in Winery Sanitation
E07 | Improvements to Existing Lab Analyses: VA by Cash Still & the Ripper Method for Measuring Free S02


E01 | Dry Reserve Riesling: East and West

Peter Bell and David Rosenthal

Peter Bell will present details on his 2014 Fox Run Reserve and Tierce dry rieslings from the Finger Lakes, while David Rosenthal, white winemaker at Chateau Ste. Michelle in Washington, does the same for Waussie (Australian style, austere, dry riesling) and Eroica (their premium/reserve slightly off-dry) riesling and joint venture with Germany’s Ernst Loosen.

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E02 | Lab Focus for Small Wineries

Tom Payette

Small winery or larger, we all have to make decisions regarding which tests we run in our winery laboratory. What tests are important to run and when? Do our instruments have the accuracy needed for correct results? Consider how to evaluate the time required to run tests, the knowledge you need to run tests, interpreting results, assessing the accuracy of results, and understanding how to act on test results. Meniscus, calibration, standardization, re-agents, pH, residual sugar and other simplified easy-to-understand chemistry presented in this session will help you decide what you can do in your own lab, when to do it, and how.

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E03 | Oak Focus: Barrel Alternatives

Peter Bell, Tim Benedict and J.L. Groux

Peter Bell, winemaker at Fox Run Vineyards, NY, Tim Benedict, winemaker at Hazlitt Vineyards and EC3, NY, and J.L. Groux, winemaker of Stratus Vineyards, ON, will pour (if available) and discuss a control vs. the same wine aged with an oak barrel alternative.

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E04 | What the YAN is Going on in My Fermentation?

Current Enological Perspectives and Practical Instructions for Nutrient Supplementation During Fermentation
Denise Gardner

Yeast assimilable nitrogen, or YAN, provides the nutritional content of a must/juice at the start of fermentation. Many winemakers have found an improvement in wine quality when they determine YAN and alter winemaking production decisions based on its value. Poor production decisions have previously focused on using the same nitrogen supplementation strategy with little consideration for the YAN or other parameters (e.g., temperature) that can affect fermentation. Currently, both industry and academia are working on YAN-related research, and they continue to develop new nitrogen recommendations in order to minimize the risk of hydrogen sulfide production by the end of fermentation.
Denise will focus on breaking down outdated nitrogen supplementation routines, review the importance of treating fermentations specific to the fruit’s YAN content, and provide suggestions for supplementation when dealing with low or high YAN fermentations.

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E05 | Lemberger & Blaufrankisch Winemaker Roundtable

Jenna LaVita, Chris Stamp and Chuck Zaleski

Lemberger, a k a Blaufränkisch, shows impressive potential and popularity in cool climate regions. Jenna, Chuck and Chris, all award-winning lemberger /blaufränkisch winemakers, will pour their own wines and provide insight to their success with this varietal. Discussion will include current varietal challenges, approaches and techniques for making award-winning wine styles with depth; cellaring techniques and management; harvesting regimen and primary fermentation protocol; varietal context within Northern climates; and vineyard protocol to ensure a successful end product.

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E06 | New Technology in Winery Sanitation

Nichola Hall and John McClain

“The wine industry is unique due to the range of soils it has to contend with. Winery-specific soil may come from grape fragments, sugar, acids, salts (bitatrates), color pigments as well as microbes and their byproducts. There may also be process residues and water considerations. By implementing appropriate cleaning protocols, and using suitable cleaning agents, the offending material can be removed, leaving the surface ready for sanitation.” –N. Hall, Scott Laboratories
John McClain of McClain Ozone will explain the new applications for ozone cleaning in wineries that have emerged since his last presentation in 2012.
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E07 | Improvements to Existing Lab Analyses: Volatile Acidity by Cash Still & the Ripper Method for Measuring Free SO2

Barry Gump, PhD

In the analysis for acetic acid (the analytical measurement of VA) using a Cash still, there are a variety of published methods suggesting the collection of various amounts of distillate for titration. Recently, using a standard acetic acid solution, Barry’s students verified that they had quantitative recovery with 100 ml of distillate. This means that wineries do not have to spend additional time collecting a larger volume of distillate.
The Ripper method using standard iodine to titrate free sulfur dioxide in wine is faster to run than the aspiration (Aeration/Oxidation) method. However, with red wines it is difficult to see the Ripper endpoint, and analytical results tend to be 10-15 mg/L of SO2 higher than those obtained with the aspiration method. Using an electrochemical endpoint for the Ripper titration eliminates the need for a visual endpoint and gives results closer to those obtained with the aspiration method in red wines.
The analytical procedures for both VA and SO2 analyses will be described, along with an explanation of the calculations required for obtaining results.

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