Wines & Vines Sharing Your Wine 2015 Show Specials RU Practical POS

2017 Eastern Winery Exposition | Viticulture Conference Sessions

V01 | Fruit Zone Leaf Removal with Cabernet Franc: Impacts on Yield & Fruit Composition
V02 | Red Blotch Virus Update
V03 | Send in the (Riesling) Clones
V04 | Effects of Crop Load and Hang Time on Wine Aroma Compounds & Sensory Properties
V05 | Nitrogen Management in Cover-Cropped Vineyards


V01 | Fruit Zone Leaf Removal in Cabernet Franc: Impacts on Yield and Fruit Composition

Cain Hickey

Fruit-zone leaf thinning has been researched extensively because it can directly change the fruit-zone microclimate and, thus, fruit composition. While fruit and wine quality are generally improved with fruit exposure, anthocyanins can be reduced when red-fruited grapes experience prolonged periods of extreme temperatures. As such, leaf thinning recommendation is conservative (1-2 leaf layers covering fruit) in the eastern U.S. even though fewer leaf layers may reduce fungal disease incidence, and temperatures of exposed grapes in many eastern U.S. growing regions may not be deleterious to fruit composition. This study evaluated if fruit-zone leaf thinning at an earlier stage (pre-bloom) or to a greater magnitude (< 1 leaf layer covering fruit) would alter cabernet franc crop yield and/or fruit composition. It was speculated that optimal fruit-zone management is growing region-specific. It was hypothesized that fruit quality would be improved with increased fruit exposure, but improved fruit quality would come at the cost of crop yield reduction when leaves were removed before bloom.

BACK TO TOP

V02 | Red Blotch Virus Update

Marc Fuchs, Margaret Kelly and Dennis Rak

Dr. Marc Fuchs of Cornell University, a leading researcher on the Red Blotch Virus, will present the latest research results and diagnostics available for growers. Dennis Rak of Double A Vineyards will explain what clean plant controls he and others in the nursery business are employing, and Margaret Kelly of the New York Department of Agriculture will explain how her office is working with Cornell and the nursery industry.
According to Dr. Fuchs, red blotch is a recently recognized viral disease of grapevines. It was first described on Vitis vinifera cv. cabernet sauvignon in California in 2008, but the causative agent was not characterized until 2012. The disease is widespread and caused by a DNA virus named Grapevine red blotch-associated virus (GRBaV). Infected red-berried cultivars exhibit symptoms similar to those associated with leafroll disease, with red blotches forming on leaves during the later summer months. In white wine cultivars, foliar symptoms are more difficult to identify and generally involve irregular chlorotic areas. GRBaV affects fruit juice chemistry, and delays fruit maturity and ripening. Information will be provided on the biology and ecology of this new disease that threatens the grapevine industry.

BACK TO TOP

V03 | Send in the (Riesling) Clones

Fred Merwarth and Bruce Murray

Bruce Murray of Boundary Breaks Vineyard and Fred Merwarth of Hermann Wiemer Vineyards, both on Seneca Lake, NY will discuss some of the specific riesling clones they use, with a focus on viticultural characteristics. Sample wines will be poured and wine character will also be discussed.
According to Bruce, “There were several goals in mind when setting out to make single clone rieslings. First was the curiosity about observable differences among the different clones on their site. Second was the practical challenge of developing a family of riesling wines, each with its own distinct character and assigning a name to each wine. Finally, the belief that the riesling grape variety has enormous range in its ability to express different flavors and textures, and the desire to start at the most basic level of the riesling variety and build up from there. Thus, the focus on clones. Bruce will explore in depth how they approached the development of their single clone rieslings, what the results have been and how they intend to broaden the investigation into riesling clones.”

BACK TO TOP

V04 | Effects of Crop Load and Hang Time on Wine Aroma Compounds and Sensory Properties

Dr. Andrew Reynolds

One of the many myths of viticulture is the assumption that any reduction in crop level in any variety will result in a significant increase in wine quality. Andrew will include data over a 30 year period from many winegrowing regions in North America, but particularly Ontario, British Columbia, and California. The focus will be the effects of crop level on several grape varieties, with abundant evidence to show that in many cases, reducing crop does not improve fruit composition and wine quality. He will emphasize a recent study in Ontario on four varieties (pinot gris, riesling, cabernet franc, and cabernet sauvignon) in which none of the varieties responded to reducing crop in terms of wine aroma compounds or sensory attributes. But there was a big chemical and sensorial response to extended hang time, as one might expect. He will also present recent information from California that supports and confirms the conclusion. Discussion will also focus on why some growers insist on cluster thinning specific varieties and not others—e.g., pinot gris, chardonnay, and riesling are rarely cluster thinned unless there are unique circumstances that necessitate the practice. Bordeaux reds are frequently cluster thinned even in balanced vineyards, mainly because of the incorrect assumption that crop removal will accelerate fruit maturity (it does not; removal of distal clusters merely eliminates the “dilution effect” caused by these less-developed, often shaded fruit). Pinot noir appears to be a unique small-clustered variety for which science may confirm popular opinion; reducing crop level does appear to lead to fruit composition and wine quality improvements. This will be an interesting session not limited in terms of controversy!

BACK TO TOP

V05 | Nitrogen Management in Cover-Cropped Vineyards

Russell Moss

Cover cropping is a nearly ubiquitous practice in the Eastern U.S. Cover crops often compete with the vine for nitrogen. Soil applications of nitrogenous fertilizer are often not very effective at increasing must nitrogen status. Therefore, many wineries have to ameliorate the low nitrogen concentrations of musts with the addition of nutrients. Russell will explore the dynamics of nitrogen in the vineyard and practical management strategies when it comes to this incredibly important nutrient.  
BACK TO TOP